By Ernest Owens

Everyone knows that one person in the crew who swears up and down that they have Native American ancestral roots. It’s almost common in Black households for family members to rep native tribes without no official reservation documents for proof. The running joke of “I’m not really Black, I got some Cherokee in me” has been used in pop culture for years.

But what was once an inside joke has now become a dangerous ideology that has taken off in the age of wokeness and Travel Noire.

Fake deep, pseudo-intellectuals, and the well-traveled are now trying to embrace this false sense of globalism as a way to divorce themselves of their Black identity to appear more insightful. Oddly enough, many of them have began to deny being Black at all as if it can be turned off like a light switch.

A recent example of such foolery came from the very-Black rapper Waka Flocka, who declared this weekend on the radio show, “Sway In The Morning,” that “I’m not African-American at all.”

“My folks is not from Africa. A lot of people in this room’s folks ain’t from Africa. Might be a couple, but people just don’t understand,” said the “Hard In the Paint” lyricist. “I asked my grandma, ‘Yo grandma, what’s your background?’ She said ‘Red foot and black tail Indian.’ I said, ‘What?’ She said, ‘Yeah.’ My mother and my father, we 100 percent Indians.’ I asked my other grandmother, and we got Cherokee in us, and European and Italian. A little Dominican.”

Everyone knows that one person in the crew who swears up and down that they have Native American ancestral roots. It’s almost common in Black households for family members to rep native tribes without no official reservation documents for proof. The running joke of “I’m not really Black, I got some Cherokee in me” has been used in pop culture for years.

But what was once an inside joke has now become a dangerous ideology that has taken off in the age of wokeness and Travel Noire.

Fake deep, pseudo-intellectuals, and the well-traveled are now trying to embrace this false sense of globalism as a way to divorce themselves of their Black identity to appear more insightful. Oddly enough, many of them have began to deny being Black at all as if it can be turned off like a light switch.

A recent example of such foolery came from the very-Black rapper Waka Flocka, who declared this weekend on the radio show, “Sway In The Morning,” that “I’m not African-American at all.”

“My folks is not from Africa. A lot of people in this room’s folks ain’t from Africa. Might be a couple, but people just don’t understand,” said the “Hard In the Paint” lyricist. “I asked my grandma, ‘Yo grandma, what’s your background?’ She said ‘Red foot and black tail Indian.’ I said, ‘What?’ She said, ‘Yeah.’ My mother and my father, we 100 percent Indians.’ I asked my other grandmother, and we got Cherokee in us, and European and Italian. A little Dominican.”

About The Author

Digital Managing Editor

Related Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.