Frederick Douglass: Descendants Read Famous July 4th Speech (VIDEO)

0


Frederick Douglass: Descendants Read Famous July 4th Speech (VIDEO) YouTube

By TheBurtonWire

NPR invited the descendants of Frederick Douglass to read “What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July?” which is one of his most famous speeches. Watch Douglass’ descendants speak his words which still resonate today.

The descendants of abolitionist and anti-slavery and women’s rights activist Frederick Douglass read excerpts from one of his most famous speeches: “What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July?” Douglass gave this speech July 5, 1852 to a group of abolitionists at the historic Corinthian Hall in Rochester, New York. The Rochester Ladies’ Anti-Slavery Society had invited Douglass to speak on the Fourth of July, but he declined because, as he explained to an audience of roughly 600 free, white people:

“The rich inheritance of justice, liberty, prosperity and independence, bequeathed by your fathers, is shared by you, not by me. The sunlight that brought life and healing to you, has brought stripes and death to me. This Fourth [of] July is yours, not mine.”

NPR invited the descendants of Frederick Douglass to read “What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July?” which is one of his most famous speeches. Watch Douglass’ descendants speak his words which still resonate today.

This post was written by Nsenga K. Burton, founder & editor-in-chief of The Burton Wire. Follow Nsenga on Twitter @Ntellectual or @NsengaBurton.

Follow The Burton Wire on Twitter @TheBurtonWire.

This article originally appeared in The Burton Wire.

Unlike many news organizations, Voice & Viewpoint delivers content that matters to you. Help us keep it that way by making a generous donation for as low as $2. Your support will fund local, investigative journalism for the community, by the community.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here