Timeline of Events Since George Floyd’s Arrest and Murder

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Demonstrators march through lower Manhattan during a rally to remember the murder of George Floyd
Demonstrators march through lower Manhattan during a rally to remember the murder of George Floyd on Tuesday, May 25, 2021, in New York. (AP Photo/Eduardo Munoz Alvarez)

The Associated Press

A timeline of key events that began with George Floyd’s arrest on May 25, 2020, by four police officers in Minneapolis:

May 25, 2020 — Minneapolis police officers respond to a call shortly after 8 p.m. about a possible counterfeit $20 bill being used at a corner grocery and encounter a Black man, later identified as George Floyd, who struggles and ends up handcuffed and facedown on the ground. Officer Derek Chauvin presses his knee into Floyd’s neck for about nine minutes while bystanders shout at him to stop. Video shows Floyd crying “I can’t breathe” multiple times before going limp. He’s pronounced dead at a hospital.

In this image from surveillance video, Minneapolis police Officers from left, Tou Thao, Derek Chauvin, J. Alexander Kueng and Thomas Lane are seen attempting to take George Floyd into custody in Minneapolis, Minn on May 25, 2020. (Court TV via AP)

May 26 — Police issue a statement saying Floyd died after a “medical incident,” and that he physically resisted and appeared to be in medical distress. Minutes later, bystander video is posted online. Police release another statement saying the FBI will help investigate. Chauvin and three other officers — Thomas Lane, J. Kueng and Tou Thao — are fired. Protests begin.

In this May 30, 2020 photo, police in riot gear walk through a cloud of blue smoke as they advance on protesters near the Minneapolis 5th Precinct in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

May 27 — Mayor Jacob Frey calls for criminal charges against Chauvin. Protests lead to unrest in Minneapolis, with some people looting and starting fires. Protests spread to other cities.

May 28 — Gov. Tim Walz activates the Minnesota National Guard. Police abandon the 3rd Precinct station as protesters overtake it and set it on fire.

May 29 — Chauvin is arrested and charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter. President Donald Trump tweets about “thugs” in Minneapolis protests and warns: “When the looting starts, the shooting starts.” Protests turn violent again in Minneapolis and elsewhere.

May 30 — Trump tries to walk back his tweet. Protests continue nationwide.

A protester launches a teargas canister back at Minnesota State Police, on May 30, 2020, in Minneapolis. George Floyd’s death after his arrest by police officers in Minneapolis on May 25, 2020, sparked widespread anger after millions of people saw video of the event. The four officers at the scene were quickly fired and charged in his death. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

May 31 — Walz says Attorney General Keith Ellison will lead prosecutions in Floyd’s death. The nationwide protests continue.

June 1 — The county medical examiner finds that Floyd’s heart stopped as police restrained him and compressed his neck, noting Floyd had existing health issues and listing fentanyl and methamphetamine use as “other significant conditions.”

June 2 — Minnesota’s Department of Human Rights launches a civil rights investigation into the Minneapolis Police Department.

June 3 — Ellison files a tougher second-degree murder charge against Chauvin and charges the other three officers who were involved in Floyd’s arrest.

June 4 — A funeral for Floyd is held in Minneapolis.

June 5 — Minneapolis bans chokeholds by police, the first of many changes to be announced in coming months, including an overhaul of the Police Department’s use-of-force policy.

June 6 — Massive, peaceful protests happen nationwide to demand police reform. Services are held for Floyd in Raeford, North Carolina, near his birthplace.

June 7 — A majority of Minneapolis City Council members say they support dismantling the Police Department. The idea later stalls but sparks a national debate over police reform.

June 8 — Thousands pay their respects to Floyd in Houston, where he grew up. He’s buried the next day.

June 10 — Floyd’s brother testifies before the House Judiciary Committee for police accountability.

Philonise Floyd, a brother of George Floyd, gives an opening statement during a House Judiciary Committee hearing on proposed changes to police practices and accountability on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, June 10, 2020, in Washington. Floyd arrived on Capitol Hill the day after funeral services for his George Floyd, who has become a worldwide symbol in demonstrations over calls for changes to police practices and an end to racial prejudices. (Michael Reynolds via AP)

June 16 — Trump signs an executive order to encourage better police practices and establish a database to track officers with excessive use-of-force complaints.

July 15 — Floyd’s family sues Minneapolis and the four former officers.

July 21 — The Minnesota Legislature passes a broad slate of police accountability measures that includes bans on neck restraints, chokeholds and so-called warrior-style training.

Oct. 7 — Chauvin posts $1 million bond and is released from state prison, sparking more protests.

Nov. 5 — Judge Peter Cahill rejects defense requests to move the officers’ trials.

Jan. 12, 2021 — Cahill rules Chauvin will be tried alone due to courtroom capacity issues. The other officers will be tried later.

Feb. 12 — City leaders say George Floyd Square, the intersection blocked by barricades since Floyd’s death, will reopen to traffic after Chauvin’s trial.

March 9 — The first potential jurors are questioned for Chauvin’s trial after a day’s delay for pretrial motions.

March 12 — Minneapolis agrees to pay $27 million settlement to Floyd family.

March 19 — Judge declines to delay or move the trial over concerns that the settlement could taint the jury pool.

March 23 — Jury selection completed.

March 29 — Opening statements are given.

April 11 — Daunte Wright, a 20-year-old Black man, is fatally shot by a white police officer during a traffic stop in suburban Brooklyn Center, sparking protests.

Demonstrators chant as they march toward the Brooklyn Center Police Department during a protest over the fatal shooting of Daunte Wright during a traffic stop, Friday, April 16, 2021, in Brooklyn Center, Minn. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

April 12 — Judge declines a request to sequester Chauvin jury immediately due to Wright ‘s death.

April 15 — Testimony ends.

April 19 — Closing arguments. Jury begins deliberations.

April 20 — Jury convicts Chauvin on murder and manslaughter charges.

May 7 — Federal grand jury indicts Chauvin, Lane, Kueng and Thao on civil rights charges.

May 25 — A street festival, musical performances and moments of silence are held in Minneapolis and elsewhere to mark the anniversary of Floyd’s death. Floyd family members meet with President Joe Biden in Washington to talk about continuing pursuit of police reforms.

Preschool children visit the site where George Floyd was murdered by then Minneapolis Police officer Derek Chauvin, as the kids took a field trip to the memorial, Thursday, June 24, 2021, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

June 25: Cahill sentences Chauvin to 22 1/2 years in prison, after agreeing with prosecutors that aggravating factors warranted going above the 12 1/2-year sentence prescribed under state guidelines.

In this image from video, defendant, former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin, listens to verdicts at his trial for the 2020 death of George Floyd, Tuesday, April 20, 2021, at the Hennepin County Courthouse in Minneapolis, Minn. (Court TV via AP)

Nov. 2: Minneapolis voters reject a proposal to replace the city’s Police Department with a new Department of Public Safety.

Dec. 15: Chauvin pleads guilty to a federal charge of violating Floyd’s civil rights.

Jan. 20, 2022: Jury selection begins in the federal civil rights trial of the other three officers.

This combination of photos provided by the Hennepin County Sheriff’s Office in Minnesota on June 3, 2020, shows, from left, former Minneapolis police officers J. Alexander Kueng, Thomas Lane and Tou Thao. A state court trial for three former Minneapolis police officers charged in the death of George Floyd has been rescheduled for June 13, 2022, after both the defense and prosecutors requested a postponement. (Hennepin County Sheriff’s Office via AP)

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