Community Beautification: Supporting our Community through Public Art

0


The new mural was officially opened during a ribbon cutting on June 24. From left to right: San Diego Urban Warriors Founder & CEO Dajahn Blevins, Mural artist Maxx Moses, SDG&E’s director of community relations Kazeem Omidiji, and City Council President Pro Tem Montgomery Steppe. (Photo courtesy of SDG&E.)

By Voice & Viewpoint Newswire

A former SDG&E electrical substation in San Diego’s Southcrest neighborhood just got a month-long makeover by a world-renowned local artist. Located along South 43rd Street between Boston and Keeler Avenues, the facility has become the artistic canvas for a community beatification in San Diego’s Fourth Council District.

The colorful mixed media mural, spanning nearly 50 feet by 6 feet tall, blends the strength of metal (brass, aluminum) with the warmth of reclaimed urban wood from Lumbercycle, a nonprofit that aims to create “zero waste utilization of trees.” The commissioned piece aims to provide relevant art, cultural enrichment, and community pride — creating a tactile experience that brings the community together visually and spiritually.

A ribbon cutting for the project was held on Friday, June 24, with San Diego City Council President Pro Tem Montgomery Steppe who represents the 4th district where the art installation is located. The initiative was the result of a community-based collaboration between SDG&E and San Diego Urban Warriors – a nonprofit that promotes and celebrates Black American arts and culture.

The ribbon cutting took place at a time when the City of San Diego is planning to petition the state to designate a Black Art and Culture District in the 4th Council District, represented by Council President Pro Tem Montgomery Steppe who is a leading champion for the designation.

“Art celebrates the history, diversity, and culture of our neighborhoods while creating a sense of unity that helps express pride in our community,” said Council President Pro Tem Montgomery Steppe.

Black artist Maxx Moses, who has a studio in Encanto, created the artwork. Renowned for his graffiti-style murals that span the globe, Moses creates artistic experiences that blend community engagement with art to create works that infuse the spirit of the surrounding community into the piece itself.

For this specific project, Moses hopes to inspire and empower passersby who may feel underserved. According to Moses, “It promotes an environment of longevity, growth, wholeness, and spiritual well-being for all to enjoy.”